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Assessment


Objective 1. Graduates will be able to demonstrate analytical and experimental scientific skills.
a) Graduates will be able to practice the process of science.

We assess scientific process skills in the introductory-level laboratory courses (BIOL 1615 & 1625) and the intermediate and upper-level labs (BIOL 3055, 3065, 3085 & 4060). Students in these courses write lab reports and give research presentations. We assess mastery of each section using a grading rubric based on Timmerman et al. (2011), in which each of eight sections is dedicated to a different part of the process of science: introduction: context, introduction: accuracy and relevance, methods, results, discussion: conclusions based on data selected, discussion: limitations of design, discussion: implications of research, references.  The eight outcomes are defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

b) Graduates will be able to use quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation to solve problems in biology.

The five quantitative reasoning outcomes are defined in Canvas to be aligned course assignments (rubrics, quizzes). We assess these on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, only one intermediate course, BIOL 3085, has collected assessment data in this way.

Objective 2. Graduates will be able to recognize and articulate fundamental concepts and principles of biology.

Assessment of Objective 2 is carried out through the Gen-Bio MAPS assessment which is administered at the beginning and end of the General Biology sequence (Biology 1610 and 1620), and in the semester preceding graduation.

Assessments are completed online using the survey tool Qualtrics. Results of the Gen-Bio MAPS assessments provide data on mean scores of USU students by core concepts and biology sub-disciplines along with the mean scores from a nationally normed group of 37 universities.

Objective 3. Graduates will acquire the practices of professional scientists.
a) Collaborate with others and work as a team.

We assess mastery using a grading rubric. The outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score). Thus far, only one introductory course, BIOL 1625, has collected assessment data with this rubric, as a self and peer assessment after a group contract and weeks-long group project.

b)
 Communicate biological concepts and interpretations to scientists in other disciplines and the general public.

We assess scientific writing in the introductory-level laboratory courses (BIOL 1615 & 1625) and the intermediate and upper-level labs (BIOL 3055, 3065, 3085 & 4060). Students in these courses write lab report. We assess mastery of overall writing quality using a grading rubric based on Timmerman et al. (2011). This outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

We assess oral communication in an introductory-level laboratory course (BIOL 1625) and an intermediate-level lab (BIOL 3085). Students in these courses give a research presentation. We assess mastery of two aspects of oral communication, clear choice of language and technical use of media, using a grading rubric based on Sevian & Gonsalves (2008). This outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

c) Demonstrate the connection between science and society.

This outcome is defined in Canvas to be aligned course assignments (rubrics, quizzes), on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, no courses have collected assessment data.

d) Distinguish scientific integrity and the ethical practice of science from deceitful and unethical scientific practices.

The eleven outcomes are defined in Canvas for alignment with course assignments (rubrics, quizzes), on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, only introductory courses (BIOL 1615, 1625) have collected assessment data via quizzes taken after training videos.


Last updated: Aug 2021

Objective 1. Graduates will be able to demonstrate analytical and experimental scientific skills.
a) Graduates will be able to practice the process of science.

We assess scientific process skills in the introductory-level laboratory courses (BIOL 1615 & 1625) and the intermediate and upper-level labs (BIOL 3055, 3065, 3085 & 4060). Students in these courses write lab reports and give research presentations. We assess mastery of each section using a grading rubric based on Timmerman et al. (2011), in which each of eight sections is dedicated to a different part of the process of science: introduction: context, introduction: accuracy and relevance, methods, results, discussion: conclusions based on data selected, discussion: limitations of design, discussion: implications of research, references.  The eight outcomes are defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

b) Graduates will be able to use quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation to solve problems in biology.

The five quantitative reasoning outcomes are defined in Canvas to be aligned course assignments (rubrics, quizzes). We assess these on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, only one intermediate course, BIOL 3085, has collected assessment data in this way.

Objective 2. Graduates will be able to recognize and articulate fundamental concepts and principles of biology.

Assessment of Objective 2 is carried out through the Gen-Bio MAPS assessment which is administered at the beginning and end of the General Biology sequence (Biology 1610 and 1620), and in the semester preceding graduation.

Assessments are completed online using the survey tool Qualtrics. Results of the Gen-Bio MAPS assessments provide data on mean scores of USU students by core concepts and biology sub-disciplines along with the mean scores from a nationally normed group of 37 universities.

Objective 3. Graduates will acquire the practices of professional scientists.
a) Collaborate with others and work as a team.

We assess mastery using a grading rubric. The outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score). Thus far, only one introductory course, BIOL 1625, has collected assessment data with this rubric, as a self and peer assessment after a group contract and weeks-long group project.

b)
Communicate biological concepts and interpretations to scientists in other disciplines and the general public.

We assess scientific writing in the introductory-level laboratory courses (BIOL 1615 & 1625) and the intermediate and upper-level labs (BIOL 3055, 3065, 3085 & 4060). Students in these courses write lab report. We assess mastery of overall writing quality using a grading rubric based on Timmerman et al. (2011). This outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

We assess oral communication in an introductory-level laboratory course (BIOL 1625) and an intermediate-level lab (BIOL 3085). Students in these courses give a research presentation. We assess mastery of two aspects of oral communication, clear choice of language and technical use of media, using a grading rubric based on Sevian & Gonsalves (2008). This outcome is defined in Canvas and aligned with course assignment rubrics. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points on rubric, an "intermediate" score).

c) Demonstrate the connection between science and society.

This outcome is defined in Canvas to be aligned course assignments (rubrics, quizzes), on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, no courses have collected assessment data.

d) Distinguish scientific integrity and the ethical practice of science from deceitful and unethical scientific practices.

The eleven outcomes are defined in Canvas for alignment with course assignments (rubrics, quizzes), on a scale of 0-3. Mastery is 67% (2/3 points). Thus far, only introductory courses (BIOL 1615, 1625) have collected assessment data via quizzes taken after training videos.


Last updated: Aug 2021

Industrial Hygiene:

The Industrial Hygiene (IH) Emphasis has been accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) since 1996 and received accreditation through 2022.

The Utah State University baccalaureate industrial hygiene program seeks to graduate well educated, entry level, industrial hygienists who are prepared for either professional practice or graduate school with a solid science background in biology and chemistry and who are competent in the principles and practice of industrial hygiene, prepared with occupational safety skills, and knowledgeable about environmental protection.  The approach of the Utah State University industrial hygiene program to achieving this goal is to integrate the knowledge gleaned from a strong basic science and humanities education into our applied science and professional practice curriculum and to meet the requirements of ABET accreditation (http://main.abet.org/aps/Accreditedprogramsearch.aspx).

Consistent with the above goals, the following Program Educational Objectives have been identified for the Industrial Hygiene emphasis: Graduates will be able to …

    • succeed in an entry-level industrial hygiene position in a regional, national, or international industry or governmental or nongovernmental agency.
    • integrate biological, chemical, and other basic sciences into their professional practice.
    • utilize existing and future technical tools and techniques within their profession.
    • work effectively within the social, organizational, regulatory, and economic constraints and opportunities of their profession.
    • pursue a graduate degree, lifelong learning activities, and/or professional certification.

The ABET accreditation process uses a standard set of “Student Outcomes” to assess the Program’s Educational Objectives.  The Student Outcomes for ABET accreditation are:  

    1. An ability to identify, formulate, and solve broadly defined technical or scientific problems by applying knowledge of mathematics and science and/or technical topics to areas relevant to the discipline.
    2. An ability to formulate or design a system, process, procedure or program to meet desired needs.
    3. An ability to develop and conduct experiments or test hypotheses, analyze and interpret data and use scientific judgment to draw conclusions.
    4. An ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences.
    5. An ability to understand ethical and professional responsibilities and the impact of technical and/or scientific solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts.
    6. An ability to function effectively on teams that establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, and analyze risk and uncertainty.

These Student Outcomes are assessed by using:

    • Exam questions from each required public health course and scoring rubrics of capstone papers in the Public Health Management Course (PUBH 5500). A cut score threshold of ≥ 75% is used as a standard to establishing success in the acquisition of each of the Student Outcomes (items a – k in the list above).
    • Evaluation of student performance in the required IH internship. This is done by each student’s supervisor using the Supervisor’s Evaluation of ABET Student Outcomes Form. Supervisor rating are given using a 1-5 scale with 1 being poor and 5 being excellent. A percentage score is assigned to each integer rating (1 = 20%; 2 = 40%; 3 = 60%; 4 = 80%; 5 = 100%) and an aggregate percentage score is calculated from all reports for items a – g, j, and k. An aggregate score of ≥75%, calculated individually for each item, is interpreted as demonstrating achievement of a given Student Outcome.  
    • Results of a survey sent to graduates two years after a student’s academic year of completion. We use terms of Very Well, Well, Needs Improvement, and Not at All to assess items a-k. Graduates are also asked to assess the 5 IH Emphasis Learning Objectives directly.  A percentage score is assigned to each rating (Very Well = 100%; Well = 75%; Needs Improvement = 50%; Not at All = 25%), responses of graduates are aggregated, and a percentage score is calculated for each item. A score of ≥ 75% is interpreted as demonstrating achievement of a given Student Outcome.  

 Data is compiled each year If an item scores ≥ 75%, this is considered as evidence of achieving the outcome. A score of <75% triggers an examination of what needs to be done for improvement. 

As an example, to assess an ability identify, formulate, and solve broadly defined technical or scientific problems by applying knowledge of mathematics and science and/or technical topics to areas relevant to the discipline (Outcome #1), 10 sub-categories are used.  Sub-categories are:

    • recognize common chemical occupational health hazards.
    • recognize common ergonomic occupational health hazards.
    • recognize common mental, psychological, and sociological occupational health hazards. recognize the hazards associated with common industrial/manufacturing operations and processes.
    • apply knowledge acquired in physics and mathematics to the generation or behavior of physical hazards in IH.
    • apply knowledge acquired in chemistry to the generation or behavior of airborne chemical hazards in IH.
    • apply knowledge acquired in biology, physiology, and toxicology to the hazard of physical agents (e.g., noise, thermal, vibration, or nonionizing or ionizing radiation).
    • apply knowledge acquired in biology, physiology, and toxicology to the hazard of chemical agents (e.g., dosing routes, metabolic pathways, toxicity terms, and common/important toxicological responses).
    • recognize the occupational hazard of biological agents.
    • recognize responses to common occupational ergonomic hazards.

 

To provide an example of test questions for each sub-category, the questions for “recognize common chemical occupational health hazards” are:

    1. Match the correct term with the correct definition: Benzene, Carbon Tetrachloride, Vinyl Chloride, Methanol, Carbon Disulfide, Formaldehyde. (6 points). 
    2. Primary route of exposure is inhalation, but skin can also be a route of exposure, often metabolized in the liver, and often causes CNS effects. (2 points). 
    3. The primary route of exposure is through inhalation, generally excreted by the kidney, not generally absorbed by the skin, often deposit in bones, kidney, or liver. (2 points). 
    4. Match the correct term with the information provided: Black Lung, Asbestosis, Metal Fume Fever, Polymer Fume Fever, Pneumoconiosis, Byssinosis. (6 points).
    5. Inhalable airborne debris during a building demolition would be considered: (2 points).
    6. Machining fluids have what 3 functions and what is the most common disorder associated with them? (4 points).
    7. For health and safety, what is the major advantage of powder paint over liquid paint systems? (2 points).
    8. What is Angiosarcoma and what is the cause of Angiosarcoma? (4 points). 
    9. Chrysotile is the most widely used asbestos type, what is the most hazardous asbestos type? (2 points)

Continuing with the example of assessment of “An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences” (Student Outcome (a)), 70 exam questions are used in the 5 required Public Health courses.  In addition, this outcome is assessed using results of the Supervisors Evaluation of Interns and results of the Alumni survey, in which graduates assess this outcome based on their experiences.

Assessment of the program curriculum and student outcomes is made with aligning program-level learning objectives as shown in the following table.

Table 1: IH Learning Objectives Compared with ASAC Student Outcome from ABET.

ABET Industrial Hygiene Curriculum AND ANSAC's Student Outcomes alignment with USU's Industrial Hygiene Program Educational Objectives
    Program Education Objectives        
  Industrial Hygiene Curriculum Succeed in an entry-level industrial hygiene position in a regional, national, or international industry or governmental or nongovernmental agency Integrate biology, chemistry, physics, and other basic sciences in the practice of their professional practice Utilize existing and future technical tools and techniques within their profession Work effectively within the social, organizational, regulatory, and economic constraints and opportunities of their profession Pursue a graduate degree, lifelong learning activities, and/or professional certification
a)  Physiological and/or toxicological interactions of physical, chemical, biological, and ergonomic agents, factors, and/or stressors with the human body    
b) Anticipation, recognition, evaluation, and control of potentially hazardous agents, conditions and practices    
c) Fundamental exposure assessment techniques (both qualitative and quantitative)    
d) Industrial hygiene data interpretation including statistical and epidemiological principles    
e) Applicable business and managerial practices      
f) Occupational and environmental standards and regulations    
g) Fundamental aspects of safety and environmental health    
  ABET Student Outcomes Program Education Objectives
1) Ability to identify, formulate, and solve broadly defined technical or scientific problems by applying knowledge of mathematics and science and/or technical topics to areas relevant to the discipline      
2) Ability to formulate or design a system, process, procedure or program to meet desired needs    
3) Ability to develop and conduct experiments or test hypotheses, analyze and interpret data and use scientific judgment to draw conclusions.    
4) Ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences      
5) Ability to understand ethical and professional responsibilities and the impact of technical and/or scientific solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts  
6) Ability to function effectively on teams that establish goals, plan tasks, meet deadlines, and analyze risk and uncertainty    

 

Assessment for the Public Health Education Emphasis is under development. The plan is to assess student achievement of learning objectives for this emphasis primarily through course-embedded evaluations given in the public health courses required for the emphasis.  These evaluations will be a combination of test questions, short essays, and the required capstone paper of the Public Health Management Course (PUBH 5500). Additional assessment modalities will be an evaluation form completed by the suprvisor of each Public Health Education intern, and a survey of graduates.  Given the range of Public Health Education Internship experiences and the flexibility in choosing capstone paper topics, not all sub-objectives will be assessed every year.  However, because there are multiple sub-objectives of each major learning objective, we are confident that it will be possible to continually assess each student’s progress.

The courses and assessment items that will be used to assess the Public Health Education Emphasis are: 

  • PUBH 3120 - Family and Community Health
    • Focuses on health aspects of various population groups within the community. Particular emphasis placed on guidelines for optimal family health.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays, and in-class discussion questions
  • PUBH 4000 - Public Health Field Experience
    • Field experience in the practice of public health education.
    • Assess with a survey (evaluation of sub-objectives from supervisor’s perspective using a 1-5 scale).
  • PUBH 4030 - Communicable Disease Control 
    • Comprehensive study of communicable diseases, including etiological agents, reservoirs of infection, and mechanisms of transmission, control, and prevention.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays
  • PUBH 4040 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology 
    • Introduction to the study of the distribution and causes of communicable and non-communicable diseases of humans and other animals.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays
  • PUBH 5000 - Public Health Seminar 
    • Participant seminar on current problems in public health.
    • Assess using scoring rubric of presentation
  • PUBH 5500 - Public Health Management
    • Presentation of basic organizational and financial management tools that students will utilize in written and oral reports on an educational, environmental, or occupational health problem of their choice.
    • Assess using scoring rubrics of written capstone paper and presentation to class

The learning objectives and associated sub-objectives were all developed from National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC) standards. The objectives and the associated courses that address each of them are:

  1. Be able to assess needs, resources, and capacity for health education/promotion
    1. Plan assessment process for health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5500
    2. Access existing information and data related to health – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    3. Collect primary data to determine needs – PUBH 4000, 5500
    4. Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5500
    5. Examine factors that influence the process by which people learn – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    6. Examine factors that enhance or impede the process of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    7. Determine needs for health education/promotion based on assessment findings – PUBH 4000, 5500
  1. Be able to plan health education/promotion
    1. Involve priority populations, partners, and other stakeholders in the planning process – PUBH 3120, 4000
    2. Develop goals and objectives for the education/promotion program – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    3. Select or design strategies/interventions – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    4. Develop a plan for the delivery of health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5500
    5. Address factors that influence implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
  1. Be able to implement health education/promotion
    1. Coordinate logistics necessary to implement plan – PUBH 4000, 5500
    2. Train staff members and volunteers involved in implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 4000
    3. Implement health education/promotion plan – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    4. Monitor implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000
  1. Be able to conduct evaluation and research related to health education/promotion
    1. Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data – PUBH 4000, 4040, 5500
    2. Collect and manage data – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    3. Analyze data – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    4. Interpret results – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    5. Apply findings – PUBH 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
  1. Be able to administer and manage health education/promotion
    1. Manage technology resources – PUBH 4000
    2. Manage relationships with partners and other stakeholders – PUBH 4000, 5500
    3. Gain acceptance and support for health education/promotion programs – PUBH 4000, 5500
    4. Demonstrate leadership – PUBH 4000, 5500
    5. Manage human resources for health education/promotion programs – No Course to assess this
  1. Be able to serve as a health education/promotion resource person
    1. Obtain and disseminate heath related information – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
  1. Be able to communicate, promote, and advocate for health, health education/promotion, and the profession
    1. Identify, develop, and deliver messages using a variety of communication strategies, methods, and techniques – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
    2. Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
    3. Influence policy and/or systems change to promote health and health education – PUBH 5500
    4. Promote the health education profession – PUBH 5000, 5500

Assessments for the Environmental Health Emphasis are under development. Like those for the Public Health Education Emphasis, the assessment tools will be a combination of test questions, short answer questions, essays, reports, the required capstone paper in the Public Health Management (PUBH 5500) course, an evaluation form completed by the supervisor or each Environmental Health intern, and a survey of graduates. 

 

The courses will be for course-embedded assessments of Environmental Health Emphasis learning objectives are:

  • PUBH 3310 - Occupational Health and Safety
    • Covers the principles of occupational health and safety, including regulatory standards. Emphasizes on-the-job health and safety problems from the occupational health and safety professional and management view.
  • PUBH 3610 - Environmental Management
    • Introduction to environmental health, emphasizing relationships among environmental quality, public health, environmental and occupational health regulations, human health risk assessment, institutions, and engineered systems in environmental health management.
  • PUBH 4000 - Public Health Field Experience
    • Field experience in the practice of environmental health
  • PUBH 4030 - Communicable Disease Control
    • Comprehensive study of communicable diseases, including etiological agents, reservoirs of infection, and mechanisms of transmission, control, and prevention.
  • PUBH 4040 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
    • Introduction to the study of the distribution and causes of communicable and non-communicable diseases of humans and other animals.
  • PUBH 4310 - Industrial Hygiene Recognition of Hazards
    • Through classroom and field experiences, provides an introduction to industrial hazards and familiarizes students with manufacturing and industrial processes in which industrial hygienists commonly work.
  • PUBH 5000 - Public Health Seminar
    • Participant seminar on current problems in public health.
  • PUBH 5500 - Public Health Management (CI)
    • Presentation of basic organizational and financial management tools that students will utilize in written and oral reports on an educational, environmental, or occupational health problem of their choice.
  • PUBH 5730 - Analysis and Fate of Environmental Contaminants
    • Provides students with understanding of methods used in analysis of environmental samples for organic contaminants. Examines various properties and processes determining the fate of organic contaminants in the environment.

 

The Environmental Health Emphasis learning objectives, the planned assessment methods, and the courses that address each learning objective are:

  1. Carry out the basics responsibilities of occupational health and safety professionals, including regulatory compliance and health and safety programs used in their day to day work activities.

Assessment: Multiple Choice Exam Questions; PUBH 3310 – Occupational Health and Safety

  1. Explain the relationship among environmental quality, public health, environmental and occupational health regulations, and engineering systems in assessing and managing community risk.

Assessment:  Exam Questions and Assignments; PUBH 3610 – Environmental Management

  1. Acquire experience in environmental health through an internship in which they practice all or some form of environmental health practice in prevention of contaminants in soil, water, or food, or in the many community practices of vector control

Assessment: Evaluation form of interns completed by profession supervisors; PUBH 4000

  1. Identify communicable disease in promoting health in a community
    1. build factual knowledge (facts, terms, methods, trends) about the major infectious diseases that shape human society
    2. describe basic principles, generalizations, and theories about communicable diseases and their control
    3. develop skills, competencies, and views valuable for careers in public health and health education

Assessment: Exam questions and assignments; PUBH 4030 – Communicable Disease Control

  1. Discuss and be able to apply concepts of epidemiology
    1. examine the foundations of epidemiology, including definitions, concepts, and applications of the field.
    2. describe important historical developments in epidemiology.
    3. explore practical disease concepts used in epidemiology.
    4. assess common study design strategies and statistical measures used in epidemiologic research.
    5. interpret the basics of causal and statistical inference.
    6. apply basic concepts and approaches used in the field of epidemiology.
    7. describe basic concepts of infectious disease, chronic disease, work, and environmental epidemiology.
    8. analyze aspects of molecular and genetic epidemiology

Assessment:  Exam questions and assignments; PUBH 4040 – Fundamentals of Epidemiology

  1. Compare industrial processes and hazards to understand the relationship and impact that such industries have on the local communities that the environmental health professional could serve.

Assessment:  Exam questions, lab scores, and field trip reports; PUBH 4310 – IH Recognition of Hazards

  1. Analyze an environmental health topic or current public health problem, prepare a presentation, and discuss that topic with an audience of peers; as an audience member, be able to participate in topic discussions.

Assessment:  Presentation Requirements; PUBH 5000 – PUBH Seminar

  1. Discuss methods and processes used in analysis of organic contaminants that can enter the environment and be able to examine various properties and processes that determine the fate of organic contaminants

Assessment:  Exam questions; PUBH 5730 – Analysis and Fate of Environmental Contaminants

  1. Complete a public health capstone paper in which the student demonstrates an ability to:
    1. Assess and evaluate the needs of a target population
    2. Develop an environmental health solution to mitigate or minimize the effects of the public health issue onto the target population.
    3. Formulate a cost analysis of the public health issue of concern versus the proposed cost of the environmental health program to determine if the intervention is cost effective.
    4. Determine a sound recommendation based on findings

Assessment: Scoring rubrics for capstone paper and presentation; PUBH 5500