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Assessment


Overview:

Student achievement of learning objectives will be assessed both longitudinally in course-embedded assessments and by comprehensive capstone assessment. Longitudinal assessments will begin in general biology lecture (BIOL 1610, 1620) and lab (BIOL 1615, 1625) courses, and continue at required benchmark courses that include General Ecology (BIOL 2200), Principles of Genetics (BIOL 3060), physiology courses (BIOL 4400, 4600, 5600, 5610), and Evolutionary Biology (BIOL 5250). These assessments will be integral components of each of these courses and take the form of concept-based exam questions and competency-based evaluation of writing, oral communication, and science process skills. The comprehensive capstone evaluation will occur independently of any particular class. This assessment will be a senior-year requirement for graduation, and it will take the form of an examination composed of a variety of question types. Performance on the comprehensive assessment will not be tied to graduation, but the purpose and importance of the assessment will be made clear to students.

Cut scores for what constitutes sufficient performance to demonstrate achievement of learning goals will be set and refined according to Zieky and Perie (A Primer on Setting Cut Scores on Test of Educational Achievement (Educational Testing Services; 2006)) as assessment data become available. Cut score thresholds will be decided on by a group of faculty with experience in the classroom and scientific expertise that collectively covers the range of biology. The outcomes assessment data will be used to learn where the current program is effective and to identify areas that need improvement. 

In addition to the use of aggregate cut scores, we will map the trajectory of individual students as they progress through the Biology Major. Students enter the Biology Major with different degrees of preparation, so that one mark of success is that students will improve their conceptual mastery of biology, their competency in practicing biological science, and in acquiring the professional habits of scientists, whatever their starting point.

The Assessment Taskforce will partner with educational technology experts of USU’s Academic and Instructional Services (AIS) and with faculty who teach the core courses used for assessment to devise methods that lessen the burden and increase the power our assessment efforts. This will be done in part by harnessing the capabilities of the University’s learning management system, Canvas. Assessments based in Canvas will facilitate tracking of individual students as they move through the Biology Major and allow rapid analysis aggregate data for each learning objective and its associated sub-objectives.

 

Longitudinal assessments:

Learning Objective

  1. Graduates will be able to demonstrate analytical and experimental scientific skills.
  1. Graduates will be able to practice the process of science.
  2. Graduates will be able to use quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation to solve problems in biology.

 

Assessment Plan:

Achievement of this objective will initially be assessed in the general biology lab courses (BIOL 1615 and 1625) and then in General Ecology (BIOL 2200), Principles of Genetics (BIOL 3060), Statistics for Scientists (STAT 3000), the laboratory components of physiology lab courses (Plant Physiology (BIOL 4400), Animal Physiology Lab (BIOL 5610), and Advanced Human Physiology (BIOL 4600), and Evolutionary Biology (BIOL 5250). Students must complete at least one of the physiology labs and all of the other courses as they progress through the Biology Major.

There will be two types of assessment: 1) use of a validated lab report rubric (Timmerman et al., 2011) to assess science practice skills and writing proficiency, and multiple-choice and short-answer exam questions given as part of standard course exams that will primarily assess quantitative reasoning, modeling, and simulation skills. The lab report rubric will be used multiple times in the freshmen general biology labs and upper division physiology labs. It assesses science process skills that include the ability to generate hypotheses, to design experiments, and to and interpret experimental results. We expect that students will demonstrate increasing sophistication in science process skills as they move from lower-level to advanced courses. The ability to use quantitative reasoning, modeling and simulation to solve biological problems will be assessed both in lab reports and by exam questions in the lecture courses listed above.

  

Learning Objective    

  1. Graduates will be able to recognize and articulate fundamental concepts and principles of biology.
  1. Demonstrate how the diversity of life evolved over time via evolutionary mechanisms.  (Assessed in BIOL 1620, 3060, 5250)
  2. Evaluate the relationships between biological structure and function.  (Assessed in BIOL 1610, 1620, 2200, 4400, 4600, 5250, 5600)
  3. Explain how the properties of organisms depend on biotic and abiotic information transfer.  (Assessed in BIOL 1610, 1620, 2200, 3060, 4600, 5250, 5600)
  4. Apply the principles of physics and chemistry to explain how living systems operate.  (Assessed in BIOL 1610, 1620, 2200, 3060, 5600)
  5. Model the interactions between organisms and their environment at population, community and ecosystem levels.  (Assessed in BIOL 1620, 2200, 4600)


Multiple-choice exam questions integrated into exams given in each course will form the core of the assessment of this learning objective and sub-objectives. Where appropriate, instructors of each course will use questions shown in published reports to be reliable and valid. These questions will come from a variety of concept inventories (for example, see Conceptual Assessments in Biology, http://www.sci.sdsu.edu/CRMSE/files/Concept_Inventories_in_Biology_20110325.pdf) or from the soon-to-be-released (December, 2016) BioMap assessments of NSF Vision and Change Concepts (A. Crowe, U. Washington, personal communication). In cases, where documented reliable and valid assessment questions are not available, course instructors and Assessment Taskforce members will partner to devise assessment questions. 

  

Learning Objective

  1. Graduates will acquire the practices of professional scientists.
  • Collaborate with others and work as a team. 
  • Communicate biological concepts and interpretations to scientists in other disciplines and the general public.
  • Demonstrate the connection between science and society.
  • Distinguish scientific integrity and the ethical practice of science from deceitful and unethical scientific practices.

 

Assessment Plan:

Mastery of this learning objective will be assessed at multiple points in the curriculum, beginning in general biology labs (BIOL 1615 and 1625). Students in these labs work in groups and their ability to collaborate with others and work as a team will be evaluated by both self- and peer-assessment.  Science communication skills (Objective 3(b)) will be assessed using the validated Analyzing How Scientist Explain their Research rubric of Sevian and Gonsalves (2008).  In labs that focus on topics at the intersection of biology and society, we will assess student ability to use scientific reasoning and to describe multiple perspectives of complex issues. These assessments will come from evaluation of both written work prepared by each student and of their oral presentations.  Finally, students will self-report in writing at least once each semester on issues of scientific integrity and ethics that they encounter when conducting labs and ways that they approach these issues.  All of these assessments will be repeated later in the curriculum in the lab components of Plant Physiology (BIOL 4400), Advanced Human Physiology (4600), and Animal Physiology (BIOL 5610). 

Written communication skills are currently assessed in the Communications Intensive capstone course Evolutionary Biology (BIOL 5250).  The existing assessment of writing will be augmented by use of the Sevian and Gonsales (2008) rubric that is used for BIOL 1615 and 1625.

 

Capstone assessment:

A senior-year capstone assessment will be developed and used to measure achievement of all learning objectives for every Biology major shortly before their graduation. We have reached out to colleagues at the University of Washington and Arizona State University who are developing rigorously-tested multiple-choice assessments of the concepts component of the National Science Foundation’s Vision and Change objectives (http://visionandchange.org/). Our own conceptual learning objectives (Objective 2) align well with the concepts featured in Vision and Change. Our colleagues have informed us that their assessment instrument, BioMaps, will be available by December, 2016 (A. Crowe, U. Washington, personal communication). We plan to use the BioMaps assessment questions that align with our learning objectives to create the capstone assessment. We will also supplement BioMaps questions with multiple choice science process skills assessments that are currently available, for example, the Test of Science Literacy Skills (Gormally et al., 2012) and tests being developed, for instance, the Science Process and Reasoning Skills Test (SPARST) (C. Driks, Evergreen State College, WA, personal communication).  The capstone assessment will be administered as a proctored exam to all graduating seniors beginning fall, 2017. The assessment will be taken online through the university’s learning management system, Canvas, at testing centers across the Utah State University system.  Canvas provides for simple, rapid, and robust analysis of results at the individual student, item, sub-objective, and objective levels.

Although a requirement for graduation, scores on the capstone assessment will not be used as a gateway to graduation. To promote diligence in students completing the assessment, we will describe its purpose in terms of its benefit to them as a way to assess their achievements and as an essential element of the Biology Department’s ongoing program to assess and strengthen the education of others who will follow them.   

Should BioMaps or SPARST be unavailable by their anticipated release dates, we will begin developing our own capstone assessment using question from existing, validated concept inventories and questions submitted by faculty and vetted by the Assessment Taskforce.

Overview

Learning objectives 1 – 3 of the Biology and Biological Composite Teaching Majors are identical and achievement of these objectives will be assessed the same way for both programs. There is a unique objective for the Biological Science Composite Teaching (BSCT) Major, shown below, which will be assessed in the following ways.

 

BSCT Major-Specific Learning Objective

  1. Graduates will demonstrate competency in the most effective science teaching methods.
Assessment benchmarks are:

  • Successfully complete the Secondary Teaching Education Program (STEP) coursework in pedagogy and teaching methods.
  • Prepare a professional teaching portfolio.
  • Successfully complete the Secondary Teaching Education Program (STEP) clinical experiences, including student teaching.
  • Demonstrate mastery of content knowledge by passing the ETS PRAXIS exam prior to their student teaching experience.

Assessment:

All teaching majors at USU receive their coursework, clinical experiences and student teaching experience in the Secondary Teaching Education Program (STEP) of the College of Education and Human Services. The performances that are assessed by the STEP are derived from the Interstate New Teacher Assessment and Support Consortium (INTASC) standards:

  • Content Pedagogy
  • Student Development
  • Diverse Learners
  • Multiple Instructional Strategies
  • Motivation and Management
  • Communication and Technology
  • Planning
  • Assessment
  • Reflective Practice: Professional Growth
  • School and Community Involvement

 

Four assessments were developed from the conceptual framework of the INTASC standards. These are:

 

Portfolio:

Students who enter the secondary education program begin developing a professional portfolio which is an integral tool in the assessment of their professional performance as a teacher. Students select materials from the professional education courses, courses in their major/minor, clinical experiences, as well as other experiences they have had working with children to demonstrate successful performance of knowledge, skills, and attitudes reflected in the 10 standards of teaching in the conceptual framework. In every secondary education course, the relationship between course work, the conceptual framework, and the portfolio is explained. Students are taught how to analyze the materials they select and how to write a rationale explaining why the artifact fits the standard(s) indicated by the student. Students must complete the portfolio before entering student teaching. The reviews of the portfolios by a committee of TEAL faculty allow faculty to identify areas of the program which are successfully preparing students to perform as teachers.

 

Student Teaching Performance Report (STPR):

The Student Teaching Performance Report (STPR) uses the same INTASC standards as the professional portfolio. The form identities tasks for each principle that delineates the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that constitutes successful performance. The evaluation form is completed jointly by the student teacher, cooperating teacher, and university supervisor as a summative evaluation of that student’s performance. The level of performance is indicated by placing a mark on a line which represents a continuum from successful completion of the task to unsuccessful performance.

 

Performance Surveys of First Year Teachers:

While the previous three sources of data are compiled as students complete the secondary education program, the performance surveys of first year teachers are designed to gather data about the students’ performance after the first year of teaching. Surveys are sent to the graduates of the secondary education program and their principals at the end of their first year of teaching. The surveys provide data as to how well beginning teachers perform in relation to the ten standards that make up the secondary education program. Information obtained from the surveys provides information for the evaluation of the secondary education program.

 

PRAXIS Content Knowledge Exams:

Prior to student teaching all teaching majors must meet a State of Utah mandated passing score in the ETS PRAXIS exam in their content area. For the Biological Sciences Composite Teaching majors that exam is 0235 Biology Content Knowledge.




Industrial Hygiene:

The Industrial Hygiene (IH) Emphasis has been accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET) since 1996 and just received accreditation through 2022. The ABET accreditation process uses a standard set of “Student Outcomes” to assess the “Program’s Educational Objectives.” These Program Objectives are the IH Emphasis Learning Objectives.  The Student Outcomes for ABET accreditation are:  

(a) An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences

(b) An ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data

(c) An ability to formulate or design a system, process, or program to meet desired needs

(d) An ability to function on multidisciplinary teams

(e) An ability to identify and solve applied science problems

(f) An understanding of professional and ethical responsibility

(g) An ability to communicate effectively

(h) The broad education necessary to understand the impact of solutions in a global and societal context

(i) A recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning

(j) A knowledge of contemporary issues

(k) An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern scientific and technical tools necessary for professional practice.

 

These Student Outcomes are assessed by using:

  • Exam questions from each required public health course and scoring rubrics of capstone papers in the Public Health Management Course (PUBH 5500). A cut score threshold of ≥ 75% is used as a standard to establishing success in the acquisition of each of the Student Outcomes (items a – k in the list above).
  • Evaluation of student performance in the required IH internship. This is done by each student’s supervisor using the Supervisor’s Evaluation of ABET Student Outcomes Form. Supervisor rating are given using a 1-5 scale with 1 being poor and 5 being excellent. A percentage score is assigned to each integer rating (1 = 20%; 2 = 40%; 3 = 60%; 4 = 80%; 5 = 100%) and an aggregate percentage score is calculated from all reports for items a – g, j, and k. An aggregate score of ≥75%, calculated individually for each item, is interpreted as demonstrating achievement of a given Student Outcome.  
  • Results of a survey sent to graduates two years after a student’s academic year of completion. We use terms of Very Well, Well, Needs Improvement, and Not at All to assess items a-k. Graduates are also asked to assess the 5 IH Emphasis Learning Objectives directly.  A percentage score is assigned to each rating (Very Well = 100%; Well = 75%; Needs Improvement = 50%; Not at All = 25%), responses of graduates are aggregated, and a percentage score is calculated for each item. A score of ≥ 75% is interpreted as demonstrating achievement of a given Student Outcome.  

 

Data is compiled each year If an item scores ≥ 75%, this is considered as evidence of achieving the outcome. A score of <75% triggers an examination of what needs to be done for improvement. 

As an example, to assess the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied science (item (a)), 10 sub-categories are used (the number in parentheses below is the number of exam questions used to assess each sub-category).  Sub-categories are:

  • recognize common chemical occupational health hazards. (9)
  • recognize common ergonomic occupational health hazards. (2)
  • recognize common mental, psychological, and sociological occupational health hazards. (3)
  • recognize the hazards associated with common industrial/manufacturing operations and processes. (10)
  • apply knowledge acquired in physics and mathematics to the generation or behavior of physical hazards in IH. (8)
  • apply knowledge acquired in chemistry to the generation or behavior of airborne chemical hazards in IH. (7)
  • apply knowledge acquired in biology, physiology, and toxicology to the hazard of physical agents (e.g., noise, thermal, vibration, or nonionizing or ionizing radiation). (7)
  • apply knowledge acquired in biology, physiology, and toxicology to the hazard of chemical agents (e.g., dosing routes, metabolic pathways, toxicity terms, and common/important toxicological responses). (15)
  • recognize the occupational hazard of biological agents. (5)
  • recognize responses to common occupational ergonomic hazards. (4)

 

To provide an example of test questions for each sub-category, the questions for “recognize common chemical occupational health hazards” are:

  1. Match the correct term with the correct definition: Benzene, Carbon Tetrachloride, Vinyl Chloride, Methanol, Carbon Disulfide, Formaldehyde. (6 points). 
  2. Primary route of exposure is inhalation, but skin can also be a route of exposure, often metabolized in the liver, and often causes CNS effects. (2 points). 
  3. The primary route of exposure is through inhalation, generally excreted by the kidney, not generally absorbed by the skin, often deposit in bones, kidney, or liver. (2 points). 
  4. Match the correct term with the information provided: Black Lung, Asbestosis, Metal Fume Fever, Polymer Fume Fever, Pneumoconiosis, Byssinosis. (6 points).
  5. Inhalable airborne debris during a building demolition would be considered: (2 points).
  6. Machining fluids have what 3 functions and what is the most common disorder associated with them? (4 points).
  7. For health and safety, what is the major advantage of powder paint over liquid paint systems? (2 points).
  8. What is Angiosarcoma and what is the cause of Angiosarcoma? (4 points). 
  9. Chrysotile is the most widely used asbestos type, what is the most hazardous asbestos type? (2 points)

Continuing with the example of assessment of “An ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and applied sciences” (Student Outcome (a)), 70 exam questions are used in the 5 required Public Health courses.  In addition, this outcome is assessed using results of the Supervisors Evaluation of Interns and results of the Alumni survey, in which graduates assess this outcome based on their experiences.

Assessment of the Industrial Hygiene Learning Objectives is made aligning program-level learning objectives with the ABET-mandated Student Outcomes. This is shown in Table 1.

Table 1: IH Learning Objectives Compared with ASAC Student Outcome from ABET.


USU's Industrial Hygiene Educational Objectives aligned with ABET ASAC's Student Outcomes

 

 

ABET Student Outcomes

Graduates will be able to …

a

b

c

d

e

f

g

h

i

j

k

1)

Evaluate and control the physical, chemical, and biological stressors that affect individuals in the occupational setting 

 

 

 

 

 

2)

Integrate biology, chemistry, physics, and other basic sciences in the practice of their profession

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3)

Utilize existing and future technical tools and techniques within their profession by understanding the basic principles of operation

 

 

 

 

4)

Apply communication and public health management skills to work effectively within the social, organizational, regulatory, and economic constraints and opportunities of their profession

 

 

 

 

 

5)

Acquire a graduate degree, pursue professional lifelong learning activities, and/or acquire professional certification through the educational background obtained

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Assessment for the Public Health Education Emphasis is under development. The plan is to assess student achievement of learning objectives for this emphasis primarily through course-embedded evaluations given in the public health courses required for the emphasis.  These evaluations will be a combination of test questions, short essays, and the required capstone paper of the Public Health Management Course (PUBH 5500). Additional assessment modalities will be an evaluation form completed by the suprvisor of each Public Health Education intern, and a survey of graduates.  Given the range of Public Health Education Internship experiences and the flexibility in choosing capstone paper topics, not all sub-objectives will be assessed every year.  However, because there are multiple sub-objectives of each major learning objective, we are confident that it will be possible to continually assess each student’s progress.

The courses and assessment items that will be used to assess the Public Health Education Emphasis are: 

  • PUBH 3120 - Family and Community Health
    • Focuses on health aspects of various population groups within the community. Particular emphasis placed on guidelines for optimal family health.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays, and in-class discussion questions
  • PUBH 4000 - Public Health Field Experience
    • Field experience in the practice of public health education.
    • Assess with a survey (evaluation of sub-objectives from supervisor’s perspective using a 1-5 scale).
  • PUBH 4030 - Communicable Disease Control 
    • Comprehensive study of communicable diseases, including etiological agents, reservoirs of infection, and mechanisms of transmission, control, and prevention.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays
  • PUBH 4040 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology 
    • Introduction to the study of the distribution and causes of communicable and non-communicable diseases of humans and other animals.
    • Assess using exam questions and short essays
  • PUBH 5000 - Public Health Seminar 
    • Participant seminar on current problems in public health.
    • Assess using scoring rubric of presentation
  • PUBH 5500 - Public Health Management
    • Presentation of basic organizational and financial management tools that students will utilize in written and oral reports on an educational, environmental, or occupational health problem of their choice.
    • Assess using scoring rubrics of written capstone paper and presentation to class

The learning objectives and associated sub-objectives were all developed from National Commission for Health Education Credentialing (NCHEC) standards. The objectives and the associated courses that address each of them are:

  1. Be able to assess needs, resources, and capacity for health education/promotion
    1. Plan assessment process for health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5500
    2. Access existing information and data related to health – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    3. Collect primary data to determine needs – PUBH 4000, 5500
    4. Analyze relationships among behavioral, environmental, and other factors that influence health – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5500
    5. Examine factors that influence the process by which people learn – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    6. Examine factors that enhance or impede the process of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    7. Determine needs for health education/promotion based on assessment findings – PUBH 4000, 5500
  1. Be able to plan health education/promotion
    1. Involve priority populations, partners, and other stakeholders in the planning process – PUBH 3120, 4000
    2. Develop goals and objectives for the education/promotion program – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    3. Select or design strategies/interventions – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    4. Develop a plan for the delivery of health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5500
    5. Address factors that influence implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
  1. Be able to implement health education/promotion
    1. Coordinate logistics necessary to implement plan – PUBH 4000, 5500
    2. Train staff members and volunteers involved in implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 4000
    3. Implement health education/promotion plan – PUBH 3120, 4000, 5500
    4. Monitor implementation of health education/promotion – PUBH 3120, 4000
  1. Be able to conduct evaluation and research related to health education/promotion
    1. Select, adapt and/or create instruments to collect data – PUBH 4000, 4040, 5500
    2. Collect and manage data – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    3. Analyze data – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    4. Interpret results – PUBH 3120, 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
    5. Apply findings – PUBH 4000, 4030, 4040, 5000, 5500
  1. Be able to administer and manage health education/promotion
    1. Manage technology resources – PUBH 4000
    2. Manage relationships with partners and other stakeholders – PUBH 4000, 5500
    3. Gain acceptance and support for health education/promotion programs – PUBH 4000, 5500
    4. Demonstrate leadership – PUBH 4000, 5500
    5. Manage human resources for health education/promotion programs – No Course to assess this
  1. Be able to serve as a health education/promotion resource person
    1. Obtain and disseminate heath related information – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
  1. Be able to communicate, promote, and advocate for health, health education/promotion, and the profession
    1. Identify, develop, and deliver messages using a variety of communication strategies, methods, and techniques – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
    2. Engage in advocacy for health and health education/promotion – PUBH 4000, 5000, 5500
    3. Influence policy and/or systems change to promote health and health education – PUBH 5500
    4. Promote the health education profession – PUBH 5000, 5500

Assessments for the Environmental Health Emphasis are under development. Like those for the Public Health Education Emphasis, the assessment tools will be a combination of test questions, short answer questions, essays, reports, the required capstone paper in the Public Health Management (PUBH 5500) course, an evaluation form completed by the supervisor or each Environmental Health intern, and a survey of graduates. 

 

The courses will be for course-embedded assessments of Environmental Health Emphasis learning objectives are:

  • PUBH 3310 - Occupational Health and Safety
    • Covers the principles of occupational health and safety, including regulatory standards. Emphasizes on-the-job health and safety problems from the occupational health and safety professional and management view.
  • PUBH 3610 - Environmental Management
    • Introduction to environmental health, emphasizing relationships among environmental quality, public health, environmental and occupational health regulations, human health risk assessment, institutions, and engineered systems in environmental health management.
  • PUBH 4000 - Public Health Field Experience
    • Field experience in the practice of environmental health
  • PUBH 4030 - Communicable Disease Control
    • Comprehensive study of communicable diseases, including etiological agents, reservoirs of infection, and mechanisms of transmission, control, and prevention.
  • PUBH 4040 - Fundamentals of Epidemiology
    • Introduction to the study of the distribution and causes of communicable and non-communicable diseases of humans and other animals.
  • PUBH 4310 - Industrial Hygiene Recognition of Hazards
    • Through classroom and field experiences, provides an introduction to industrial hazards and familiarizes students with manufacturing and industrial processes in which industrial hygienists commonly work.
  • PUBH 5000 - Public Health Seminar
    • Participant seminar on current problems in public health.
  • PUBH 5500 - Public Health Management (CI)
    • Presentation of basic organizational and financial management tools that students will utilize in written and oral reports on an educational, environmental, or occupational health problem of their choice.
  • PUBH 5730 - Analysis and Fate of Environmental Contaminants
    • Provides students with understanding of methods used in analysis of environmental samples for organic contaminants. Examines various properties and processes determining the fate of organic contaminants in the environment.

 

The Environmental Health Emphasis learning objectives, the planned assessment methods, and the courses that address each learning objective are:

  1. Carry out the basics responsibilities of occupational health and safety professionals, including regulatory compliance and health and safety programs used in their day to day work activities.

Assessment: Multiple Choice Exam Questions; PUBH 3310 – Occupational Health and Safety

  1. Explain the relationship among environmental quality, public health, environmental and occupational health regulations, and engineering systems in assessing and managing community risk.

Assessment:  Exam Questions and Assignments; PUBH 3610 – Environmental Management

  1. Acquire experience in environmental health through an internship in which they practice all or some form of environmental health practice in prevention of contaminants in soil, water, or food, or in the many community practices of vector control

Assessment: Evaluation form of interns completed by profession supervisors; PUBH 4000

  1. Identify communicable disease in promoting health in a community
    1. build factual knowledge (facts, terms, methods, trends) about the major infectious diseases that shape human society
    2. describe basic principles, generalizations, and theories about communicable diseases and their control
    3. develop skills, competencies, and views valuable for careers in public health and health education

Assessment: Exam questions and assignments; PUBH 4030 – Communicable Disease Control

  1. Discuss and be able to apply concepts of epidemiology
    1. examine the foundations of epidemiology, including definitions, concepts, and applications of the field.
    2. describe important historical developments in epidemiology.
    3. explore practical disease concepts used in epidemiology.
    4. assess common study design strategies and statistical measures used in epidemiologic research.
    5. interpret the basics of causal and statistical inference.
    6. apply basic concepts and approaches used in the field of epidemiology.
    7. describe basic concepts of infectious disease, chronic disease, work, and environmental epidemiology.
    8. analyze aspects of molecular and genetic epidemiology

Assessment:  Exam questions and assignments; PUBH 4040 – Fundamentals of Epidemiology

  1. Compare industrial processes and hazards to understand the relationship and impact that such industries have on the local communities that the environmental health professional could serve.

Assessment:  Exam questions, lab scores, and field trip reports; PUBH 4310 – IH Recognition of Hazards

  1. Analyze an environmental health topic or current public health problem, prepare a presentation, and discuss that topic with an audience of peers; as an audience member, be able to participate in topic discussions.

Assessment:  Presentation Requirements; PUBH 5000 – PUBH Seminar

  1. Discuss methods and processes used in analysis of organic contaminants that can enter the environment and be able to examine various properties and processes that determine the fate of organic contaminants

Assessment:  Exam questions; PUBH 5730 – Analysis and Fate of Environmental Contaminants

  1. Complete a public health capstone paper in which the student demonstrates an ability to:
    1. Assess and evaluate the needs of a target population
    2. Develop an environmental health solution to mitigate or minimize the effects of the public health issue onto the target population.
    3. Formulate a cost analysis of the public health issue of concern versus the proposed cost of the environmental health program to determine if the intervention is cost effective.
    4. Determine a sound recommendation based on findings

Assessment: Scoring rubrics for capstone paper and presentation; PUBH 5500